ullman sails
01752 337131
request
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

DINGHIES

18FT skiff
420
470
505
albacore
b14
cadet
contender
enterprise
europe
falcon
finn
fireball
firefly
flying dutchman
foxer
gp14
graduate
gull
heron
int. 14
Int. canoe
int. moth
javelin
kestrel
lark
laser 1
leader
lightning
merlin rocket
miracle
mirror
national 12
national 18
OK
optimist
osprey
phantom
redwing
scorpion
sharpie
snipe
solo
splash
streaker
swallow
wanderer
wayfarer
 

CUSTOMise your
own SPINNAKER
book

 

International Moth
DINGHIES | INTERNATIONAL MOTH
buy  
   

Crew: 1 man crew. For racing, ideal weight of sailors should be between 60 and 80kgs.
Dimensions: 3.35 meters in length, 2.25 meters in width and ±6kg.
Sail Area: 8 square meters.
Class: Restricted (hull shape remains the same from year to year)
Characteristics:
Singlehanded, radical development class that has seen some true innovations in sailing.
Difficulty Level: Experienced

A typical Moth hull is 3.35m long and 2.25m wide with the entire rigged boat weighing at only 25-35kg. Combining an 8sqm sail and "wing" develops an incredible power to weight ratio making Moths one of the fastest single handed dinghy's. While being a true development class, the hull and rig have now been refined to a stage where sailing skill rather than technical innovation determines race performance.

One of the beauties of the class is that it takes dedication above and beyond most conventional sailing dinghies. This does not appeal to everyone, but to the select few. To be able to hone your Moth sailing skills so that you can drive the razor-sharp hulls in all conditions is an exhilarating experience.

Being a development class, the moth has evolved from a hull in the 1930s that could best be described as a heavy, narrow scow or a blunt nosed skiff, (weighing about 50 kg) to today’s remarkable foilers with hull weights of under 10 kg. Designs have run the gamut from wide skiffs without wings, to lightweight scows, to wedge-shaped hulls characterized with narrow waterlines and hiking wings out to the maximum permitted beam. Likewise, the sail plan has evolved from cotton sails on wooden spars, through the fully battened Dacron sails on aluminum spars stage, to the windsurfer inspired sleeved film sails on carbon masts seen today.

Since the addition of hydrofoils to the boat, the International Moth Class has experienced remarkable worldwide growth, including a resurgence in the United States. The moth has become the standard of a successful hydrofoiling class, with most foils and control systems based on developments by John Ilett in Australia. As such, it is currently one of only two practical foiling monohulls, the second being the foiling version of the RS600, though recently the R-class skiff in New Zealand has seen some boats add hydrofoils as well. There are now several manufacturers supporting Moth fleet growth, including Mach 2 boats (Australia/China), Bladerider (Australia/China), Aardvark Boats (UK), and Assassin (New Zealand).

Areas of rapid development in the class currently (2009) include rigid sails, wing masts, hydrofoils and foil control systems.

 

For further information please visit www.internationalmoth.co.uk
www.ullmansails.co.uk designed by Tina Grobler